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Who Is Maria Ressa? Wiki, Bio, Age, Birth Sign, Early life And Education, Career, Fame, Awards and Achievements, Personal Life, Husband & Children, Arrest, Updates, Net Worth And Many More Facts You Need To Know

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Maria A. Ressa was born on October 2, 1963. She is a Filipino-American journalist and author, best known for co-founding Rappler as its executive director. She previously spent nearly two decades working as a principal investigative reporter in Southeast Asia for CNN. Ressa was featured in Time’s Person of the Year 2018 as one of a collection of journalists from around the world who fight fake news. She was arrested for “cyber crime” amid accusations of several false news cases and corporate tax evasion on February 13, 2019. On June 15, 2020, a court in Manila convicted her of cyberlibel.  As an open critic of Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte, her arrest was seen by the international journalistic community as a politically motivated act by the government of the latter. Ressa is one of the 25 main figures of the Information and Democracy Commission launched by Reporters Without Border.

She had a six-year term as director of the ABS-CBN News and Current Affairs division.  She also written two books on the rise of terrorism in Southeast Asia, ‘Seeds of Terror’ and ‘From Bin Laden to Facebook’. Throughout her illustrious career She has received numerous honors and awards for her courageous and truthful journalism, including the ‘Golden Pen of Freedom Award’, the ‘International Knight Journalism Award’, the ‘Gwen Ifill Press Freedom Award’, the ‘Journalist of Courage and Impact Award’ and ‘IX International Prize for Freedom of the Press’. Ressa, who has redefined journalism by combining traditional broadcasting, new media, and mobile phone technology, believes “it is about the news and telling it well. The ratings will continue.” She is not married and spends all her time “fighting against misinformation, fake news and attempts to silence the free press.”

Age

She is 56 years old

Birth Sign

Birth Sign is  ‘Libra’

Early life And Education

Maria A. Ressa was born on October 2, 1963 in the Philippines, but she moved to New Jersey, United States with her parents when she was only 10 years old. He had to learn to speak English along with his studies, and at the same time, I learned eight different musical instruments, from piano to glockenspiel. Initially, he wanted a medical degree and joined a molecular biology course at Princeton University, but then switched to English, where he earned his honorary degree. He also took drama classes at Princeton, performed in plays, sang in a band, and played basketball. After graduating cum laude from Princeton, she was considering a career as a playwright when she received a Fulbright scholarship and returned to the Philippines in 1986. She eventually obtained her master’s degree in journalism from the University of the Philippines Diliman.

Personal Life

She is unmarried and dedicates all her time to “fighting disinformation, fake news and attempts to silence the free press.”

Fame

She is famous as a Journalist.

Career

Maria Ressa began her journalistic career working for the iconic ’60 Minutes’ news program in the second half of the 1980s and also worked in the PTV-4 news department. She then became a producer for the renowned television journalist Diane Sawyer. In 1987, after the People’s Power Revolution (also known as the EDSA Revolution) in the Philippines, he co-founded Probe Productions with Cheche Lazaro, who began broadcasting investigative journalism in the country with ‘Probe Profiles’.

The award-winning series, originally broadcast on ABS-CBN, was extremely successful due to the freedom of the press that the revolt and dismantling of the Ferdinand Marcos dictatorship had brought with it. Thanks to her American accent, she served as Chief of the Manila Office on CNN in 1988 and was the network’s top investigative reporter in Asia for the next 17 years. She also served as Head of the Jakarta Office on CNN from 1995 to 2005.During this time, she covered all major incidents in the region, including the Indonesian riots (1998), the East Timor crisis (1999), and the EDSA Revolution (2001), and interviewed several past and current Asian heads of state. Present. Her mainly handled terrorism news and actively persecuted emerging terrorist groups in Southeast Asia.

In 2000, after the bombing of the house of the Philippine ambassador in Jakarta, she began to investigate the Moorish Islamic Liberation Front and was the first to link the group with Al Qaeda. He later published his findings in the 2003 book “Seeds of Terror: An Eyewitness Account of Al-Qaeda’s New Operations Center in Southeast Asia.” Ressa, who was on vacation with her parents in Batangas in December 2004, when the tsunami in the Indian Ocean occurred, decided to leave CNN and settle in Makati, Manila, surprising even her family. In early 2005, she joined the ABS-CBN News and Current Affairs division as a training consultant for Channel 2.

Although she was only a reporter for CNN, she enjoyed her new job responsibilities in the new network, which included establishing and maintaining “international standards for reporting, technical services, and operations.” However, she continued to cover terrorism even after leaving CNN, and participated in an international conference on terrorism in Bangkok in April 2005. She continued to work as the head of her department at ABS-CBN until late 2010, when she sent an internal email to the network stating that she would not renew her six-year contract. In his letter, which was posted on the network’s website on October 11, 2010, she also detailed how he intended to make a proper transition by handing over responsibilities to the new department head. It was rumored at the time that he had returned to independent journalism due to differences with ABS-CBN over the newly appointed news readers for the ‘TV Patrol’ program he had revived. In 2012, he co-founded the online news website ‘Rappler’, which would play a key role in the impeachment of Chief Justice Renato Corona.

In January 2018, the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) was reported to have revoked Rappler’s certificate for violating the foreign capital restrictions of the Philippine Constitution in the media. While the news came shortly after President Rodrigo Duterte accused Rappler of having sold a majority stake in the company to the foreign firm Omidyar Network, the Palace spokesman later denied any attempt to violate press freedom.

In November 2018, the Department of Justice (DOJ) indicted Rappler Holdings Corporation for tax evasion and for failing to file tax returns. Describing it as yet another attempt by the government to muzzle the media for criticizing him, Rappler published an article stating that the case was only for harassment and had no legal basis.

Major Works

Maria Ressa, who dedicated her early journalistic career to fighting terrorism, has written two books on the rise of terrorism in Southeast Asia. ‘Seeds of Terror: An Eyewitness Account of Al-Qaeda Newest Center of Operations in Southeast Asia’ was published in 2003, followed by ‘From Bin Laden to Facebook 10 Days of Kidnapping, 10 Years of Terrorism’ in 2013.

Awards and Achievements

Maria Ressa was the youngest person to fill the position of head of office on CNN. For her “Al-Qaeda eyewitness account,” she was named the “Sexiest Woman Alive” in the Philippines by ‘Esquire’ magazine in 2010. In 2015, he received the ‘Excellence in Lifetime Achievement Transmission’ award at the 29th Philippine Movie Press Club ‘PMPC Star Awards for Television Award’. On behalf of Rappler, she was honored with the 2017 ‘Democracy Award’ by the Democratic National Institute at the annual Democracy Award Dinner in Washington, D.C. In June 2018, he won the prestigious ‘Golden Pen of Freedom Award’ from the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers (WAN-INFRA). In December 2018, she became the second Filipina to receive Time’s Person of the Year honor after former President Corazon Aquino in 1986.

Arrest

On January 22, 2018, Ressa appeared before the Philippine National Bureau of Investigation (NBI) to comply with a subpoena on an online defamation complaint. The citation was issued on January 10 to Ressa, along with former Rappler reporter Reynaldo Santos and businessman Benjamin Bitanga. The subpoena was filed in October 2017 by a Filipino-Chinese citizen, Wilfredo Keng, after Rappler published a story about Keng’s alleged loan of his sports vehicle to judicial president Renato Corona, now deceased, as a form of bribed favor. . In November 2018, the Philippine government announced that it would charge Ressa and Rappler’s parent company, Rappler Holdings Corporation, of tax evasion and failure to file tax returns. The charge refers to the investment in Rappler by the Omidyar Network in 2015. Ressa has denied wrongdoing, originally claiming that the foreign money was “donated” to its managers, later claiming that the Investments were in the form of securities. Rappler issued a statement denying any wrongdoing. The Philippine Internal Revenue Office, after a study of Ressa’s explanation, ruled that Rappler’s issuance of capital gains generated by securities was taxable. It was concluded that Rappler evaded that payment in the amount of $ 133 million in taxes. On February 13, 2019, Philippine judge Rainelda Estacio-Montesa of Section # 46 of the Court of First Instance of the Manila Regional Court issued the arrest warrant for “cyber libel” against Ressa for an article published in Rappler. Officials from the Philippine National Bureau of Investigation complied with this court order filed on the cyber libel charge. The “cyber defamation” law was passed after the article was originally published, so the charge was based on the technicality that fixing a typo could be considered “republished.” The arrest was broadcast live by many of Rappler’s top reporters on Facebook. Due to time constraints, Ressa was unable to post a bond of $ 60,000 ($ 1,150) which resulted in his arrest and confinement within the boardroom office of the NBI building. A total of six attorneys, two pro bono, were assigned to work on his case. On February 14, 2019, in the process of execution of the judge of the city of Manila, María Teresa Abadilla, Ressa was released by paying a bond of $ 100,000 ($ 1,900).

Ressa’s arrest was criticized by the international community. As an outspoken critic of President Rodrigo Duterte, many viewed the arrest as politically motivated. In contrast, the official spokesman for the Malacañang Palace denied any government involvement in the arrest, stating that the lawsuit against Ressa was filed by an individual, the plaintiff Wilfredo Keng. Madeleine Albright, former US Secretary of State. The US issued an opinion stating that the arrest “must be condemned by all democratic nations.”  Similarly, the Philippine National Union of Journalists called it “a shameless act of persecution by a harassing government.” The National Press Club, an organization accused of having close ties to the Duterte regime and with a long history of criticizing the Rappler organization, has stated that the arrest was not harassment, and that Ressa should not be relegated to the “altar of freedom of the press”. for martyrdom. “He also warned against politicizing the issue. Ressa’s trial on cyberlibel charges began in July 2019. In a statement he made on the first day of his trial, Ressa said: “This cyberlibel case stretches the rule of law until it is broken.” Ressa was found guilty on June 15, 2020.

Updates

Maria Ressa: Philippine journalist found guilty of cyber libel

In a case seen as evidence of Philippine media freedom, journalist Maria Ressa was found guilty of cyber libel. She denied the charges and claimed they were politically motivated. A former writer for her news site, Rappler, was also convicted. Both have been released on bail pending appeal, but could face six years in prison. Press freedom advocates say the trial aims to silence critics of President Rodrigo Duterte. But the president and her supporters have accused her and her site of reporting false news. In a country where journalists are threatened, Ms. Ressa’s case became symbolic and closely followed, both nationally and internationally.

What was she accused of?

The case against her relates to an eight-year-old Rappler story on businessman Wilfredo Keng’s alleged ties to a former judge. The prosecution came under a “cyber-libel” law which came into force in September 2012 – four months after Rappler published the article.

In a case seen as evidence of Philippine media freedom, journalist Maria Ressa was found guilty of cyber libel. She denied the charges and claimed they were politically motivated. A former writer for her news site, Rappler, was also convicted. Both have been released on bail pending appeal, but could face six years in prison. Press freedom advocates say the trial aims to silence critics of President Rodrigo Duterte. But the president and her supporters have accused her and her site of reporting false news. In a country where journalists are threatened, Ms. Ressa’s case became symbolic and closely followed, both nationally and internationally.

Maria Ressa’s net worth

Maria Ressa’s estimated net worth, salary, income, cars, lifestyles and many more details have been updated below. Let’s see, how rich is Maria Ressa in 2020?

Estimated Net Worth

in 2019 $1 Million – $5 Million (Approx.)

In 2018 $100,000 – $1 Million

 

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